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No Great Depression Here: The Wealth of the 1930 Census
By Kathleen W. Hinckley, CGRS
 More of this Feature
• Introduction
• 1930 Census Finding Aids
• 1930 Census in the News
 
 Special Chat!
Professional genealogist, Kathleen W. Hinckley, and NARA archivist, Jefferson Moak, will be special guests in our chat room on Wednesday, May 22 from 9pm-10:30pm Eastern Standard Time to discuss tips for researching the 1930 U.S. Census.
Learn More About this special online "Virtual Lecture"!
 
  Related Resources
• 1930 Census Resources on the Internet
• Using U.S. Census Records for Genealogical Research
• More U.S. Census Resources
• Census Records Around the World

 Elsewhere on the Web
• Pennsylvania Genealogical Society
 
 

The 1930 U.S. Federal census was released to the public on April 1, 2002. Microfilm copies are available for viewing at the National Archives, Washington, D.C., and in the following 13 regional branches:

Central Plains Region, Kansas City, MO
Great Lakes Region, Chicago, IL
Great Lakes Region, Dayton, OH
Mid-Atlantic Region, Philadelphia, PA
Northeast Region, Boston, MA
Northeast Region, Pittsfield, MA
Northeast Region, New York City, NY
Pacific Region, Laguna Niguel, CA
Pacific Region, San Bruno, CA
Pacific Alaska Region, Anchorage, AK
Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, CO
Southeast Region, East Point, GA
Southwest Region, Fort Worth, TX

The Family History Library, Salt Lake City, and other major libraries with genealogical collections received their copies of the 1930 census in early April. Date of availability will vary according to cataloging schedules.

Fun Fact: The question “Have you a radio?” was included in the census to provide the Radio Commission with information regarded as essential for effective administration of the radio law and not for the purpose of future taxation of receiving sets. The answers would also provide an index of the American standard of living.

- New York Times, New York, NY
Saturday, April 19, 1930, 7:6
 

1930 Census Questions

1930 Census included Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, Panama Canal Zone, and Samoa

  • street or road name, whether a house number or if a farm *
  • name, age, and sex of each individual in the household
  • relationship to the head of household
  • whether owned or rented home and if mortgaged *
  • value of home if owned or monthly payment *
  • whether owned a radio set *
  • color or race
  • whether single, married, widowed, or divorced
  • age at first marriage *
  • whether attended school
  • whether can read and write
  • place of birth
  • father’s place of birth
  • mother’s place of birth
  • language spoken in home before coming to the United States *
  • year of immigration
  • whether naturalized or an alien
  • whether can speak English
  • type of profession or kind of work
  • type of industry or business
  • class of worker *
  • whether worked yesterday or the last regular working day
  • whether a veteran, and if so, what war

*These questions were not included in the Alaska census.
 

Indians in 1930

The Census Bureau instructed enumerators to report the degree of Indian blood of American Indians and the names of their tribes. Since there was not a place on the form for this information, they were instructed to use the columns intended for the birthplaces of the father and mother.
 

Race in 1930

Races reported in 1930 census: White, Negro, Mulatto, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Hindu, and Korean. If the individual was of another race, the enumerators were instructed to report the race and write it in full.

A person of mixed white and Indian blood was to be reported as an Indian except when the percentage of Indian blood was very small or when the person was regarded as white in the community.

Someone who was part Indian and part Negro was to be reported as Negro unless the Indian blood predominated and the person was generally accepted as an Indian in the community.
 

Next page > 1930 Census Finding Aids - Locating Your Ancestor

 



URL: http://genealogy.about.com/library/authors/uchinckley1a.htm
© 2002 Kathleen W. Hinckley, CGRS.  Used with Permission.

 

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